Alaska's indigenous people feel the heat of climate change

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Alaska's indigenous people feel the heat of climate changeThe cemetery has already been moved twice, the old school is underwater and the new one is facing the same fate as erosion constantly eats away at the land in Napakiak. The tiny village located in southwestern Alaska, along the meandering Kuskokwim River, is one of dozens of coastal indigenous communities across the state that are on the front lines of climate change, their very existence and way of life threatened by the warming temperatures. 'The shoreline keeps eroding much faster than predictions and we are continuously having to move back from the river to higher ground,' city council member Walter Nelson told an AFP team on a recent tour of the isolated village of 350 residents, most of them Yupik Eskimos.


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